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DP
Wessambenghazi Benghazi shared SBZone Radio's video: ‎مقطع نشرته احدى الوكالات الامريكية‎.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:34:41 PM
مقطع نشرته احدى الوكالات الامريكية
المقطع نشرته احدى الوكالات الامريكيه وحذرت من ما سيحدث عام 2016 ..by {Mc}
DP
Greg Miller shared Conservative News's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:34:24 PM
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Because of Benghazi and MANY other things, do you think Obama is unfit to be President?

What will happen when food prices continue to increase past what you can afford? Find out now:
CLICK HERE ►► http://i-bitly.com/food.php
DP
Rome Hanson shared Forward's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:33:50 PM
Timeline Photos
#WakeUp #2014IsAboutYou #Republicans #TeaParty

The Republican/Tea Party/Right-wing Control & Manipulate Their Base By Pulling G-Stings
GOD... GUNS... & GAYS

When signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Johnson turned to Sargent Shriver, who was sitting next to him and said "We just lost the South." That was the moment when the mass exodus of the last remaining Dixie Democrats happened. They leapt in the arms of the Republican Party and the transformation of the two parties occurred. Republicans were overtaken by the "conservatives" (code name for selfish, backwards bigots) and the Democrats became the new liberals, the stand for civil rights and progressive Government.

1%ers like the Koch brothers & corporations fund the right wing campaign of hate for one simple reason. When people are filled with hate they are easy to manipulate.

The truth is that for some it is not, nor has it ever been about facts, honesty or truth. Logic is wasted on them. For you cannot reason with the unreasonable.

They claim Voter ID Laws are needed to stop the nonexistent voter fraud problem. But Common Sense Gun Laws that could save thousands of lives are not.
http://www.brennancenter.org/analysis/policy-brief-truth-about-voter-fraud

They say women should not have the right to make their own healthcare decisions.
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/20/opinion/sunday/the-attack-on-women-is-real.html?_r=0

They have called President Obama incompetent & dishonest. But found George Bush competent & truthful.
http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-628069

They are inconsolable over Benghazi. Yet have found a way to live with the 53 people killed in the 12 attacks on our Embassies under Bush. Along with the almost 3,000 men, women & children who died horrific deaths on 9/11. And the well over 900,000 & counting who’ve died in Iraq & Afghanistan.
http://www.unknownnews.org/casualties.html

Many of you have posed the question -"Why do they continue to vote against their own best interest?"

The Answer…

There is a portion of the population who are tribal by nature. Who are only comfortable around others they consider to be mentally, physically & spiritually like themselves. In some cases a feeling of superiority is derived from the low rating of those outside of their “Tribe.”

They thrive on the us vrs them mentality. Give them someone or something to hate and they are as happy as a hog in slop. And as long as you are seen to be a member of their “Tribe" almost anything you do will be accepted.

Which is why the Republican/Tea Party uses cultural, regional & religious differences to widen the divide between Americans. Republicans have concocted a “Tribal Cocktail.” This vile Tea is a mixture of False Religion, Bigotry, Fear & Lies. It makes their base vote against all they hold dear. Their Families, their Country, their GOD, & Themselves.
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=willful+ignorance

Conditioned to hate, they are the ultimate single issue voters. Which is why these very same people did nothing during the Bush years. But now feel the need to wear tea bags & wave snake flags.

Hate is a powerful emotion. Unless kept in check hate can cause an avalanche of destruction. It wreaks havoc on relationships, breaks up families & even takes away innocent lives. With hate dark thoughts of revenge and destruction can cloud the mind. Hate not only harms the people around us; it also erodes our own character. And can even destroy Nations.
DP
Teri Leathley shared Together We Served's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:32:35 PM
Timeline Photos
Beirut mission renewed: Marines take pride in returning to guard embassy

(View Together We Served's Memorial Roster http://marines.togetherweserved.com/publicassociationroster/332)

The return of Marines to Beirut as full-time embassy guards for the first time in more than 30 years is a notable milestone for those who fought to maintain stability in Lebanon, a country oft-wracked with religious and ethnic tensions.

As of early September, Marine security guards are again manning Post One in Beirut. From their perch in the lobby they screen building visitors and, most importantly, safeguard classified information for the first time since the 1980s.

The post holds profound significance for Marines young and old. The embassy there was bombed in 1983 and again in 1984. But the most vicious attack occurred in October 1983 when a suicide bomber in an explosive-laden truck destroyed the Marine Corps barracks at the Beirut airport killing 220 Marines, 18 sailors and three soldiers. Official investigations would later reveal that the explosion was the largest non-nuclear blast in history up to that point — equivalent to 21,000 pounds of TNT.

It was the single biggest loss of Marines since the Battle of Iwo Jima.

The incident hastened the withdrawal of U.S. and international peacekeepers. A contingent of Marines continued to guard the embassy until 1986 and on a temporary basis through the early 1990s. Seeing the return of full-time MSGs marks a proud day for many who served there.

“It is just right to have our Marines there with our ambassador and our team,” said Maj. Gen. Mark Brilakis, the commanding general of Marine Corps Recruiting Command. He served in Beirut as a lieutenant at the time of the barracks bombing and lost six fellow Marines from his unit. “It is good for the State Department and good for the Marine Corps and good for the nation of Lebanon.”

The return to Beirut is a sign of U.S. commitment to diplomacy, said Fred Lash, a retired Marine public affairs officer who served in Beirut at the time of the first embassy bombing.

Lash, a charter member of the Beirut Veterans of America, who refers to that chapter of Marine history as “the first battle against terrorism,” added that the return is a proud moment not just for Marines, but for the country as a whole.

“I think it takes things full circle. They can knock you off the horse, and you can stay off the horse for a while, but you are going to get in the saddle again,” he said. “It shows willingness on the part of the American people and State Department to stick with this diplomacy thing.”

When Lash arrived in March 1983, he said things were peaceful. He would often drive up to Le Commodore Hotel, where much of the press corps he dealt with lived.

“It was a soft-cover kind of trip,” he said. “We might have had a helmet and flak thrown in the back, but we thought peace was just around the corner. Then the bombing started.”

The first major strike was against the embassy on April 18, 1983. Lash had been slated to hold a joint news briefing with the State Department there, but a last minute decision was made to hold it at the airport.

About five to 10 minutes after 1 p.m., a massive explosion erupted, killing 17 Americans including the Marine at Post One. In all, 63 people died in the embassy explosion. The recovery included accounting for the human toll, as well as digging out the Marine killed at Post One and the U.S. flag, which Lash was entrusted to deliver to leadership at the Pentagon.

'The continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence'

Brilakis, then a naval gunfire support team leader, said his Marines began taking fire not long after arriving with Bravo Battery, 1st Battlaion, 10th Marines, assigned to Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 8th Marines.

“Some of the fighting going on between the Lebanese army and various militias started to affect the airport,” he said. “Our days were filled with patrolling. When things got a little more fractious and a little more lethal, we spent more time providing security.”

From their position near the airport, the Marines were easy targets from surrounding mountains.

Burlakis said in a Sept. 19, 1983, story in the Los Angeles Times, “This position breaks all the rules,” as Marines worked each day to fortify their positions with sandbags as added protection against rocket and artillery fire.

“I think for those who have learned that Marines are back in Beirut representing the Marine Corps and defending sovereign U.S. soil in that embassy — it is a point of pride to have Marines back in that embassy,” he said.

Last October, he attended the 30th anniversary observance ceremony at the Beirut Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, for the barracks bombing.

“The overarching emotion from all those guys was one of pride, pride of being Marines, pride of having served in a location where their nation sent them. They were ordered to go do a job and they did it the best way they could,” he said. “What happened in Beirut, why we went and what we tried to do is another star in the constellation that is the U.S. Marine Corps.”

The re-establishment of an MSG presence in Beirut reflects current efforts to bolster security at embassies across the globe.

“This is another phase of the continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence in Beirut,” said Capt. Eric Flanagan, the Marine Corps Embassy Security Group spokesman at the Pentagon. “It is a re-energizing and reaffirmation of our commitment to our diplomatic security mission. Additionally, this is a sign of the steady growth of the Marine Security Guard program.”

Following the 2012 attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, Congress directed the Marine Corps to add 1,000 Marine security guards throughout the world.

Currently, the Marine Corps has about 1,500 security guards and it plans to add hundreds more next year so it can meet its target of 2,200 guards by 2016. The State Department has identified about 35 diplomatic posts that need Marine guards, of which the Corps has opened detachments at 17, including in South Africa, Gabon and the Republic of Congo.

The Marine Corps has also created a Security Augmentation Unit based at Marine Corps base Quantico, Virginia, that has about 130 Marines who can deploy immediately if needed to bolster diplomatic security. Those Marines are trained embassy guards.

“I’m really proud of what Marines doing with MSAU and the Special Purpose-MAGTF,“ Lash said. “They can do all the things in the world to make you pull out, but it is really a good feeling to go back in. I would say Tripoli at some point — when the situation is right — we’ll go back, set up the embassy and MSG will be there.”
DP
Rod Goebel shared Together We Served's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:31:49 PM
Timeline Photos
Beirut mission renewed: Marines take pride in returning to guard embassy

(View Together We Served's Memorial Roster http://marines.togetherweserved.com/publicassociationroster/332)

The return of Marines to Beirut as full-time embassy guards for the first time in more than 30 years is a notable milestone for those who fought to maintain stability in Lebanon, a country oft-wracked with religious and ethnic tensions.

As of early September, Marine security guards are again manning Post One in Beirut. From their perch in the lobby they screen building visitors and, most importantly, safeguard classified information for the first time since the 1980s.

The post holds profound significance for Marines young and old. The embassy there was bombed in 1983 and again in 1984. But the most vicious attack occurred in October 1983 when a suicide bomber in an explosive-laden truck destroyed the Marine Corps barracks at the Beirut airport killing 220 Marines, 18 sailors and three soldiers. Official investigations would later reveal that the explosion was the largest non-nuclear blast in history up to that point — equivalent to 21,000 pounds of TNT.

It was the single biggest loss of Marines since the Battle of Iwo Jima.

The incident hastened the withdrawal of U.S. and international peacekeepers. A contingent of Marines continued to guard the embassy until 1986 and on a temporary basis through the early 1990s. Seeing the return of full-time MSGs marks a proud day for many who served there.

“It is just right to have our Marines there with our ambassador and our team,” said Maj. Gen. Mark Brilakis, the commanding general of Marine Corps Recruiting Command. He served in Beirut as a lieutenant at the time of the barracks bombing and lost six fellow Marines from his unit. “It is good for the State Department and good for the Marine Corps and good for the nation of Lebanon.”

The return to Beirut is a sign of U.S. commitment to diplomacy, said Fred Lash, a retired Marine public affairs officer who served in Beirut at the time of the first embassy bombing.

Lash, a charter member of the Beirut Veterans of America, who refers to that chapter of Marine history as “the first battle against terrorism,” added that the return is a proud moment not just for Marines, but for the country as a whole.

“I think it takes things full circle. They can knock you off the horse, and you can stay off the horse for a while, but you are going to get in the saddle again,” he said. “It shows willingness on the part of the American people and State Department to stick with this diplomacy thing.”

When Lash arrived in March 1983, he said things were peaceful. He would often drive up to Le Commodore Hotel, where much of the press corps he dealt with lived.

“It was a soft-cover kind of trip,” he said. “We might have had a helmet and flak thrown in the back, but we thought peace was just around the corner. Then the bombing started.”

The first major strike was against the embassy on April 18, 1983. Lash had been slated to hold a joint news briefing with the State Department there, but a last minute decision was made to hold it at the airport.

About five to 10 minutes after 1 p.m., a massive explosion erupted, killing 17 Americans including the Marine at Post One. In all, 63 people died in the embassy explosion. The recovery included accounting for the human toll, as well as digging out the Marine killed at Post One and the U.S. flag, which Lash was entrusted to deliver to leadership at the Pentagon.

'The continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence'

Brilakis, then a naval gunfire support team leader, said his Marines began taking fire not long after arriving with Bravo Battery, 1st Battlaion, 10th Marines, assigned to Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 8th Marines.

“Some of the fighting going on between the Lebanese army and various militias started to affect the airport,” he said. “Our days were filled with patrolling. When things got a little more fractious and a little more lethal, we spent more time providing security.”

From their position near the airport, the Marines were easy targets from surrounding mountains.

Burlakis said in a Sept. 19, 1983, story in the Los Angeles Times, “This position breaks all the rules,” as Marines worked each day to fortify their positions with sandbags as added protection against rocket and artillery fire.

“I think for those who have learned that Marines are back in Beirut representing the Marine Corps and defending sovereign U.S. soil in that embassy — it is a point of pride to have Marines back in that embassy,” he said.

Last October, he attended the 30th anniversary observance ceremony at the Beirut Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, for the barracks bombing.

“The overarching emotion from all those guys was one of pride, pride of being Marines, pride of having served in a location where their nation sent them. They were ordered to go do a job and they did it the best way they could,” he said. “What happened in Beirut, why we went and what we tried to do is another star in the constellation that is the U.S. Marine Corps.”

The re-establishment of an MSG presence in Beirut reflects current efforts to bolster security at embassies across the globe.

“This is another phase of the continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence in Beirut,” said Capt. Eric Flanagan, the Marine Corps Embassy Security Group spokesman at the Pentagon. “It is a re-energizing and reaffirmation of our commitment to our diplomatic security mission. Additionally, this is a sign of the steady growth of the Marine Security Guard program.”

Following the 2012 attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, Congress directed the Marine Corps to add 1,000 Marine security guards throughout the world.

Currently, the Marine Corps has about 1,500 security guards and it plans to add hundreds more next year so it can meet its target of 2,200 guards by 2016. The State Department has identified about 35 diplomatic posts that need Marine guards, of which the Corps has opened detachments at 17, including in South Africa, Gabon and the Republic of Congo.

The Marine Corps has also created a Security Augmentation Unit based at Marine Corps base Quantico, Virginia, that has about 130 Marines who can deploy immediately if needed to bolster diplomatic security. Those Marines are trained embassy guards.

“I’m really proud of what Marines doing with MSAU and the Special Purpose-MAGTF,“ Lash said. “They can do all the things in the world to make you pull out, but it is really a good feeling to go back in. I would say Tripoli at some point — when the situation is right — we’ll go back, set up the embassy and MSG will be there.”
 Kaye Malone Boucher likes this
DP
Lori Blaylock shared Together We Served's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:31:12 PM
Timeline Photos
Beirut mission renewed: Marines take pride in returning to guard embassy

(View Together We Served's Memorial Roster http://marines.togetherweserved.com/publicassociationroster/332)

The return of Marines to Beirut as full-time embassy guards for the first time in more than 30 years is a notable milestone for those who fought to maintain stability in Lebanon, a country oft-wracked with religious and ethnic tensions.

As of early September, Marine security guards are again manning Post One in Beirut. From their perch in the lobby they screen building visitors and, most importantly, safeguard classified information for the first time since the 1980s.

The post holds profound significance for Marines young and old. The embassy there was bombed in 1983 and again in 1984. But the most vicious attack occurred in October 1983 when a suicide bomber in an explosive-laden truck destroyed the Marine Corps barracks at the Beirut airport killing 220 Marines, 18 sailors and three soldiers. Official investigations would later reveal that the explosion was the largest non-nuclear blast in history up to that point — equivalent to 21,000 pounds of TNT.

It was the single biggest loss of Marines since the Battle of Iwo Jima.

The incident hastened the withdrawal of U.S. and international peacekeepers. A contingent of Marines continued to guard the embassy until 1986 and on a temporary basis through the early 1990s. Seeing the return of full-time MSGs marks a proud day for many who served there.

“It is just right to have our Marines there with our ambassador and our team,” said Maj. Gen. Mark Brilakis, the commanding general of Marine Corps Recruiting Command. He served in Beirut as a lieutenant at the time of the barracks bombing and lost six fellow Marines from his unit. “It is good for the State Department and good for the Marine Corps and good for the nation of Lebanon.”

The return to Beirut is a sign of U.S. commitment to diplomacy, said Fred Lash, a retired Marine public affairs officer who served in Beirut at the time of the first embassy bombing.

Lash, a charter member of the Beirut Veterans of America, who refers to that chapter of Marine history as “the first battle against terrorism,” added that the return is a proud moment not just for Marines, but for the country as a whole.

“I think it takes things full circle. They can knock you off the horse, and you can stay off the horse for a while, but you are going to get in the saddle again,” he said. “It shows willingness on the part of the American people and State Department to stick with this diplomacy thing.”

When Lash arrived in March 1983, he said things were peaceful. He would often drive up to Le Commodore Hotel, where much of the press corps he dealt with lived.

“It was a soft-cover kind of trip,” he said. “We might have had a helmet and flak thrown in the back, but we thought peace was just around the corner. Then the bombing started.”

The first major strike was against the embassy on April 18, 1983. Lash had been slated to hold a joint news briefing with the State Department there, but a last minute decision was made to hold it at the airport.

About five to 10 minutes after 1 p.m., a massive explosion erupted, killing 17 Americans including the Marine at Post One. In all, 63 people died in the embassy explosion. The recovery included accounting for the human toll, as well as digging out the Marine killed at Post One and the U.S. flag, which Lash was entrusted to deliver to leadership at the Pentagon.

'The continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence'

Brilakis, then a naval gunfire support team leader, said his Marines began taking fire not long after arriving with Bravo Battery, 1st Battlaion, 10th Marines, assigned to Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 8th Marines.

“Some of the fighting going on between the Lebanese army and various militias started to affect the airport,” he said. “Our days were filled with patrolling. When things got a little more fractious and a little more lethal, we spent more time providing security.”

From their position near the airport, the Marines were easy targets from surrounding mountains.

Burlakis said in a Sept. 19, 1983, story in the Los Angeles Times, “This position breaks all the rules,” as Marines worked each day to fortify their positions with sandbags as added protection against rocket and artillery fire.

“I think for those who have learned that Marines are back in Beirut representing the Marine Corps and defending sovereign U.S. soil in that embassy — it is a point of pride to have Marines back in that embassy,” he said.

Last October, he attended the 30th anniversary observance ceremony at the Beirut Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, for the barracks bombing.

“The overarching emotion from all those guys was one of pride, pride of being Marines, pride of having served in a location where their nation sent them. They were ordered to go do a job and they did it the best way they could,” he said. “What happened in Beirut, why we went and what we tried to do is another star in the constellation that is the U.S. Marine Corps.”

The re-establishment of an MSG presence in Beirut reflects current efforts to bolster security at embassies across the globe.

“This is another phase of the continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence in Beirut,” said Capt. Eric Flanagan, the Marine Corps Embassy Security Group spokesman at the Pentagon. “It is a re-energizing and reaffirmation of our commitment to our diplomatic security mission. Additionally, this is a sign of the steady growth of the Marine Security Guard program.”

Following the 2012 attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, Congress directed the Marine Corps to add 1,000 Marine security guards throughout the world.

Currently, the Marine Corps has about 1,500 security guards and it plans to add hundreds more next year so it can meet its target of 2,200 guards by 2016. The State Department has identified about 35 diplomatic posts that need Marine guards, of which the Corps has opened detachments at 17, including in South Africa, Gabon and the Republic of Congo.

The Marine Corps has also created a Security Augmentation Unit based at Marine Corps base Quantico, Virginia, that has about 130 Marines who can deploy immediately if needed to bolster diplomatic security. Those Marines are trained embassy guards.

“I’m really proud of what Marines doing with MSAU and the Special Purpose-MAGTF,“ Lash said. “They can do all the things in the world to make you pull out, but it is really a good feeling to go back in. I would say Tripoli at some point — when the situation is right — we’ll go back, set up the embassy and MSG will be there.”
DP
Generral Benghazi shared ‎فتاة الشرق‎'s video.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:28:12 PM
DP
Bella Benghazi shared ‎قصي الزوي‎'s video.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:27:51 PM

مِنْ إمام مَنْزِلَ مُحَمَّدِ العريبي الشَّهِيرَ بَاسِمَ (( بوكا )) والذى كَانَ فِي السَّابِقِ مُسَاعِدَ إمر دَرِعَ لِيبْيَا بنغازي الْقُوَّةَ الثَّانِيَةَ
DP
Winzeref ونزيرف الرحيبات
at Oct 23, 2014 8:26:51 PM
مقالة اجنبية مطولة عن جبل نفوسة - جادو

Jail To Save Your Language?
By Jess HillJuly 26, 2012

In suburban Sydney, a young boy learned about his Berber history. He’s been through jail and revolution as he fights to revive the Amazigh culture in Libya.

Mazigh Buzakhar paces up and down the café, his voice low and a phone pressed to his ear. After a few minutes, he sits back at the table with a sigh.
"It's the federalists," he says, referring to a separatist group based in Libya's east. "They're threatening one of our facilities. We may have to pull our workers out."
“We have no problem with other religions — Christians, Jews. But the Arabic-speaking Muslims —they only accept themselves.”
− HENSHIR
Mazigh, 29, is an operations manager with a company that services Libya's oilfields. He keeps his voice down now to be polite, not secretive. In spectacles, baseball cap and polo shirt tucked into his trousers, he's the very image of a procedural man.
Only last year Buzakhar was in a maximum-security prison, ten minutes' drive from where we are sitting. He and his identical twin, Madghis, were awaiting a show trial that would rubberstamp their life sentences. Then came the revolution.
Their crimes? Fighting to revive a language Colonel Gaddafi had banned. The Buzakhars brothers are Amazigh, otherwise known as Berbers, who are native to North Africa. When Gaddafi, a dedicated pan-Arabist, seized power in 1969, he was determined to grind their culture into the dust. Just as Turkey's founding father, Kemal Atatürk, constitutionally excluded the Kurds, Gaddafi declared Libya a state for just one people: Arabs who spoke Arabic. From then on, communicating in Tamazight, calling children Amazigh names — cleaving to Amazigh heritage in anyway — was forbidden, sometimes on pain of death. Tamazight had been North Africa's predominant spoken language before the Arabs invaded in the seventh century, but to Gaddafi's paranoid mind it was "colonialism's poison". When the twins were arrested in December 2010, Mazigh's library, stacked with Amazigh books he'd smuggled into Libya, was a smoking gun.
"If it wasn't for the revolution, we wouldn't be speaking right now," he says, shaking his head. After being held incommunicado in a black, windowless cell for several weeks, Mazigh and his brother were moved to a prison in Tripoli, where they slept next to each other on the floor. Suddenly in February, after the uprising began in Benghazi, a spontaneous firestorm of protest hit the capital. The prison inmates rioted.
"Somehow, the prisoners got control of the jail," Mazigh recalls. "Then Gaddafi's brigades surrounded the jail and started shooting 14.5s [heavy machine guns]. We were thinking of Abu Salim," he says, referring to a notorious prison massacre that claimed 1,200 lives. "We thought they were going to kill us all."
But they didn't. Shortly afterwards, much to Mazigh's surprise, the prisoners were all released.
Out of jail, he wasted no time pondering what had just happened. The next day he drove west to the Nafusa Mountains, the traditional home of the Amazigh. Here, as Gaddafi's tanks were strafing the foothills below, Mazigh helped to establish a media centre, from where he began communicating with reporters around the world.
was during this time that I was first introduced to Mazigh over Skype, and was startled to find out that he and his brother had been educated at Narwee High School, a public school in Sydney's south.
In the months that followed, in these besieged but self-governed mountain towns, something extraordinary started happening: the Amazigh started resuscitating their culture. New radio stations broadcast in Tamazight for the first time, and between reporting to the media and collecting information for NATO, Mazigh launched the first Amazigh newspaper to ever be published in Libya. Printed in Arabic and the ancient Tamazight script, Mazigh called it Tilelli, or Freedom. (He is still the newspaper's editor-in-chief, albeit now from where he lives and works in the capital.)
As we sat together in Tripoli, updates from the oilfields lighting up his phone, Mazigh agreed to accompany me for a day into the Nafusa Mountains. We parted ways, planning to meet very early that Sunday, and as he walked away I found myself wondering: how does a culture, defined for so long by resistance, rediscover itself once its oppressor is dead?
THE TWO-HOUR DRIVE FROM TRIPOLI to the Nafusa Mountains is almost featureless, a long stretch of desert punctuated by patches of scrub and the occasional tank left to rot beside the highway. If animals inhabit these areas, they're hiding, and a good idea that is, too; the North African sun has steadied at a fierce 45 degrees.
“I could see the culture in Libya, but I found about it in Australia.”
− MAZIGH BUZAKHAR
As we scour the roadside for a functioning coffee machine, Mazigh recalls his time in Australia. He was 11 years old when his family moved suddenly from a small town in the Libyan desert to the south Sydney suburb of Narwee.
"I didn't know what Australia was, what a Western country was," he says. Mazigh was about to start Year 7 and he didn't speak one word of English. After a two-month intensive English course, he started school at Narwee High. "Narwee was great, totally great. When I compare it with the Libyan education system," he trails off, shaking his head.
In Australia, Mazigh had access to two new things that would change his life: a foreign library, with books about the Amazigh, and the internet. "I could see the culture in Libya, but I found about it in Australia," he says.
Online, Mazigh discovered the Amazigh diaspora. "These cultural websites were focused on the political part of the movement, getting people to wake up, and rise again." Then, when Mazigh was in Year 10, his father finished his PhD scholarship and took the family back to Libya.
the time he returned to his home country in 1998, he was deeply entwined in the activist movement, and soon began travelling to meet other Amazigh 'militants' across North Africa and Europe. When he and his brother were finally arrested in 2010 on charges of spying, news of their detention spread through the global Amazigh community, triggering a wave of protests and campaigns.
Approaching the mountains, we pass a military compound that's been literally bombed into the sand. "NATO," he nods.
"In Libya, everything was a risk," he says pensively. "If you crossed the road, it was a risk. Because there's no law, nothing that protects you. Even now, you think we have freedom? No. If you criticise someone, militia can come and 'handle' the problem," he says, staring at the road ahead. "They can kill you, but, you know, don't complain. Who did it? Nobody knows. But don't complain. We're not really a stable country."
Mazigh boycotted the elections. He wanted nothing to do with them; as Libyans celebrated raucously in the streets outside, Mazigh slept through the entire day. "All the politicians are old," he says angrily. "Who rose up? The young people. If the elders had been given any chance to run the show, we would have been fucked up."
When he and his brother were finally arrested in 2010 on charges of spying, news of their detention spread through the global Amazigh community, triggering a wave of protests and campaigns.
Early in the conflict, elders in a nearby village were so eager to placate Gaddafi's brigades, they were preparing to hand over their revolutionary sons, he says. "If you gave a small chance to the elders, they would have surrendered." As the fighting intensified, most fled to Tunisia. "The younger ones ran the show — military, logistics, media, everything. But once Tripoli was liberated, the elders came back in. And now they want to run the show."
As the car wends its way up from the foothills and into the mountains, Mazigh weighs up which group are more damaging to Libya's future: the elders, or the Islamists who have gained a political foothold. He pauses. "You know, maybe there's a way we can use the elders right now. Because if there's one thing Islamists hate, it's the elders. They're organised, and they have the word. And the elders don't know about this 'Islamists' thing — it's all shit to them," he says. "So we can use them now, at this moment. But later on they'll have to step out, to let young politicians run the country." Were there no young candidates to vote for in the election, I ask? "We have younger ones, but they have no capabilities."
WE DRIVE INTO JADU, THE HILLTOP TOWN where Mazigh spent most of the war. Old adobe houses decorate the sun-bleached hillside, but the only people using them are the goat herders, who take shade beneath their walls while their animals graze. There is barely a soul on the streets: heat and the national holiday have driven most of Jadu's inhabitants indoors. But that's not the only reason it feels deserted. "Most of the people who were here during the revolution have moved back to Tripoli," says Mazigh. It's his first trip back to the mountains since he left for Tripoli last August, when Gaddafi was driven from the capital.
We pull up at an old mud house, and two men in a rust-ravaged sedan arrive to open it. Inside, the museum is designed like a traditional Amazigh house, with low cave-like doorways opening to rooms decorated sparsely with local artefacts and mannequins in quaint traditional dress from the farming and herding days of the pre-Islamic Amazigh. In photos glued onto cardboard are the veiled men of the Tuareg, an Amazigh tribe that's been getting headlines for its bloody takeover of neighbouring northern Mali.
Libyans who identify as Amazigh today make up only around five per cent of the population, though Mazigh insists that most Libyans have merely forgotten their Amazigh roots. He has several times pointed out that he is "not an Arab", though after centuries of Arab-Amazigh interbreeding that distinction is derived more from force of will and culture than of blood. On the day-to-day level, is there really anything that makes the Amazigh so different from the Arabs?
"It's all about the language," Mazigh says, insisting that only those who can speak Tamazight can call themselves 'pure Amazigh'. In 'pure' towns like Jadu and Zuwara, "our Arabic is very bad," laughs Mazigh.
We go behind the museum to see the synagogue, a former place of worship for the once-numerous community of Libyan Jews, and then we give up on Jadu. "Sleepy Libyans," giggles Mazigh as we drive through its vacant streets towards the gravel plains that lead to Yifren, Mazigh's home town, an hour's drive away.
"It's a big mess here," says Mazigh, as we again ascend back into the mountains. "There are three villages near Zintan [a small city in the Nafusa Mountains known for its ferocious militia] that are completely empty," he says, referring to villages that sided with Gaddafi. "They can't come back — they know what will happen to them."
“Gaddafi’s brigades surrounded the jail and started shooting 14.5s [heavy machine guns]. We were thinking of Abu Salim ... We thought they were going to kill us all.”
− MAZIGH BUZAKHAR
Mazigh is taking me to meet some "true Amazigh militants", who are just about to launch a new radio station. Said Henshir, an audio engineer with the station, shows us in to a sophisticated new studio, festooned with Amazigh and Libyan flags. For a station in the middle of nowhere, they're impressively resourced: 20 journalists have been trained to report from all over Libya in Arabic, Tamazight, English, and soon, French.
"Here is a real Amazigh militant!" exclaims Mazigh as a young, skinny guy walks into the room. Azru Magoura, 17, presents the station's morning program and, together with Henshir, he recently made the first ever film scripted in Tamazight.
"Tamazight was the original language here in North Africa," says Henshir. "But when the Arabs came, they tried to take our language. Now we're fighting to get it back."
"From beginning to end, Libya is Amazigh," adds Magoura.
Apart from the language, I ask, what's so different about the Amazigh? "All we share with the Arabs is religion," says Henshir. "Look at us — the skin, everything is totally different." The Amazigh are traditionally light-skinned, but interbreeding across North Africa, makes it hard to distinguish between the two groups. Henshir suggests another distinction. "We have no problem with other religions — Christians, Jews," he says. "But the Arabic-speaking Muslims — they only accept themselves."
Magoura says that while Gaddafi may be gone, the struggle is not over — not by a long shot. "Pure Arabs don't believe in the Amazigh," he says. He says the next big fight is to get the Amazigh and the Tamazigh language recognised in the constitution. And it won't end there. "We will struggle until we become elders," he says, and the determination in his young, chiseled features seems to say that only a fool would disbelieve him.
UNDER GADDAFI, EMBATTLED AMAZIGH COMMUNITIES fought to keep their language alive, even as those who dared to speak it outside their homes were punished. The job of teaching it to the children fell to the mothers, the traditional keepers of the language and its oral traditions.
This may sound romantic, but for Amazigh women, the reality is morbid. Marrying an Arab Libyan man is strictly forbidden, and women who pursue a relationship outside the community can be punished or disowned. It's rare to see a woman in public, and certainly not one out on her own: men keep a close watch over their female relatives, and permit them very little independence.
Though Mazigh counts himself as a secular liberal, he seems to have no issue with these limitations on the love lives of Amazigh women. "If they marry outside, the culture goes with them," he shrugs, suggesting there's little alternative. Amazigh men, on the other hand, do not face the same restrictions, because they are not responsible for passing on the culture. How do Amazigh women feel about this, I ask? Mazigh pauses. "That's a good question. You should ask one." We go to the home of one Amazigh woman, a member of a local women's association, but after a discussion at the gate with her husband, we're sent away. No explanation is given.
Mazigh is no misogynist — far from it. On the back pages of his newspaper are advertisements for women's associations, including one of Libya's most progressive groups, The Voice of Libyan Women. But when we talk about the status of women in these communities, it's like there's no alternative available to the status quo.
For months I've been fascinated by the renaissance of the Amazigh culture. As the world's languages die out at record speed, it's heartening to see one get pulled back from the brink. But it's impossible to ignore the heavy price modern Amazigh women — some of whom would no doubt like to marry outside their community — have to pay to preserve it. In isolated areas, when the conditions are right, it's relatively easy for tribal cultures to maintain their purity. But in areas that are merely two hours' drive from the nation's capital, this isolation has to be enforced. And when a culture is forced into a mode of resistance over several decades, as the Amazigh have been, this tendency towards isolation becomes even stronger, and deviation from the tribe is an even greater betrayal.
If the Amazigh are recognised in the new constitution, they will get the right to pass on their language outside of the family home. But will this cultural freedom translate into greater freedoms for Amazigh women? Like all groups defined by their resistance, the Amazigh are at a critical turning point. Can they truly move toward the free expression of their culture, or will they merely continue the legacy of their oppressor by oppressing their own?
 محمد مهني , Yeddr S GL , Salem Sallam , راضي زاويه likes this
محمد مهني commented at Oct 23, 2014 8:31:31 PM
        تانميرت
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عليك وقت :/ مفرخ مقملين يهددو في مناطق بأكملها ..

توا تقوم الدولة والقملة هذا يشلّط على ... اشدوقه .. ويطوّح في أول إصلاحية ..

أبشرو بما يسوؤكم يا عباد القمل .. :D ..
 Abuo Alabdein likes this
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Michael Libby shared Together We Served's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:26:08 PM
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Beirut mission renewed: Marines take pride in returning to guard embassy

(View Together We Served's Memorial Roster http://marines.togetherweserved.com/publicassociationroster/332)

The return of Marines to Beirut as full-time embassy guards for the first time in more than 30 years is a notable milestone for those who fought to maintain stability in Lebanon, a country oft-wracked with religious and ethnic tensions.

As of early September, Marine security guards are again manning Post One in Beirut. From their perch in the lobby they screen building visitors and, most importantly, safeguard classified information for the first time since the 1980s.

The post holds profound significance for Marines young and old. The embassy there was bombed in 1983 and again in 1984. But the most vicious attack occurred in October 1983 when a suicide bomber in an explosive-laden truck destroyed the Marine Corps barracks at the Beirut airport killing 220 Marines, 18 sailors and three soldiers. Official investigations would later reveal that the explosion was the largest non-nuclear blast in history up to that point — equivalent to 21,000 pounds of TNT.

It was the single biggest loss of Marines since the Battle of Iwo Jima.

The incident hastened the withdrawal of U.S. and international peacekeepers. A contingent of Marines continued to guard the embassy until 1986 and on a temporary basis through the early 1990s. Seeing the return of full-time MSGs marks a proud day for many who served there.

“It is just right to have our Marines there with our ambassador and our team,” said Maj. Gen. Mark Brilakis, the commanding general of Marine Corps Recruiting Command. He served in Beirut as a lieutenant at the time of the barracks bombing and lost six fellow Marines from his unit. “It is good for the State Department and good for the Marine Corps and good for the nation of Lebanon.”

The return to Beirut is a sign of U.S. commitment to diplomacy, said Fred Lash, a retired Marine public affairs officer who served in Beirut at the time of the first embassy bombing.

Lash, a charter member of the Beirut Veterans of America, who refers to that chapter of Marine history as “the first battle against terrorism,” added that the return is a proud moment not just for Marines, but for the country as a whole.

“I think it takes things full circle. They can knock you off the horse, and you can stay off the horse for a while, but you are going to get in the saddle again,” he said. “It shows willingness on the part of the American people and State Department to stick with this diplomacy thing.”

When Lash arrived in March 1983, he said things were peaceful. He would often drive up to Le Commodore Hotel, where much of the press corps he dealt with lived.

“It was a soft-cover kind of trip,” he said. “We might have had a helmet and flak thrown in the back, but we thought peace was just around the corner. Then the bombing started.”

The first major strike was against the embassy on April 18, 1983. Lash had been slated to hold a joint news briefing with the State Department there, but a last minute decision was made to hold it at the airport.

About five to 10 minutes after 1 p.m., a massive explosion erupted, killing 17 Americans including the Marine at Post One. In all, 63 people died in the embassy explosion. The recovery included accounting for the human toll, as well as digging out the Marine killed at Post One and the U.S. flag, which Lash was entrusted to deliver to leadership at the Pentagon.

'The continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence'

Brilakis, then a naval gunfire support team leader, said his Marines began taking fire not long after arriving with Bravo Battery, 1st Battlaion, 10th Marines, assigned to Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 8th Marines.

“Some of the fighting going on between the Lebanese army and various militias started to affect the airport,” he said. “Our days were filled with patrolling. When things got a little more fractious and a little more lethal, we spent more time providing security.”

From their position near the airport, the Marines were easy targets from surrounding mountains.

Burlakis said in a Sept. 19, 1983, story in the Los Angeles Times, “This position breaks all the rules,” as Marines worked each day to fortify their positions with sandbags as added protection against rocket and artillery fire.

“I think for those who have learned that Marines are back in Beirut representing the Marine Corps and defending sovereign U.S. soil in that embassy — it is a point of pride to have Marines back in that embassy,” he said.

Last October, he attended the 30th anniversary observance ceremony at the Beirut Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, for the barracks bombing.

“The overarching emotion from all those guys was one of pride, pride of being Marines, pride of having served in a location where their nation sent them. They were ordered to go do a job and they did it the best way they could,” he said. “What happened in Beirut, why we went and what we tried to do is another star in the constellation that is the U.S. Marine Corps.”

The re-establishment of an MSG presence in Beirut reflects current efforts to bolster security at embassies across the globe.

“This is another phase of the continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence in Beirut,” said Capt. Eric Flanagan, the Marine Corps Embassy Security Group spokesman at the Pentagon. “It is a re-energizing and reaffirmation of our commitment to our diplomatic security mission. Additionally, this is a sign of the steady growth of the Marine Security Guard program.”

Following the 2012 attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, Congress directed the Marine Corps to add 1,000 Marine security guards throughout the world.

Currently, the Marine Corps has about 1,500 security guards and it plans to add hundreds more next year so it can meet its target of 2,200 guards by 2016. The State Department has identified about 35 diplomatic posts that need Marine guards, of which the Corps has opened detachments at 17, including in South Africa, Gabon and the Republic of Congo.

The Marine Corps has also created a Security Augmentation Unit based at Marine Corps base Quantico, Virginia, that has about 130 Marines who can deploy immediately if needed to bolster diplomatic security. Those Marines are trained embassy guards.

“I’m really proud of what Marines doing with MSAU and the Special Purpose-MAGTF,“ Lash said. “They can do all the things in the world to make you pull out, but it is really a good feeling to go back in. I would say Tripoli at some point — when the situation is right — we’ll go back, set up the embassy and MSG will be there.”
 Zach Lamblez likes this
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Benghazi MyHarte shared Dr. Yaseen Hayajneh Page's video: ‎الرمز‎.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:25:57 PM
الرمز
الشجاعة والنخوة والوفاء والأمانة والرحمة وغيرها من المعاني النبيلة في موقف واحد.
 Rafa Al Obidi likes this
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2d Battalion 4th Marines shared Together We Served's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:24:44 PM
The Marine Corps Family knows that terrorism is nothing new or to be taken lightly. Remember the fallen, learn from the past, apply your pride and proffessionalism, and continue to march!
Timeline Photos
Beirut mission renewed: Marines take pride in returning to guard embassy

(View Together We Served's Memorial Roster http://marines.togetherweserved.com/publicassociationroster/332)

The return of Marines to Beirut as full-time embassy guards for the first time in more than 30 years is a notable milestone for those who fought to maintain stability in Lebanon, a country oft-wracked with religious and ethnic tensions.

As of early September, Marine security guards are again manning Post One in Beirut. From their perch in the lobby they screen building visitors and, most importantly, safeguard classified information for the first time since the 1980s.

The post holds profound significance for Marines young and old. The embassy there was bombed in 1983 and again in 1984. But the most vicious attack occurred in October 1983 when a suicide bomber in an explosive-laden truck destroyed the Marine Corps barracks at the Beirut airport killing 220 Marines, 18 sailors and three soldiers. Official investigations would later reveal that the explosion was the largest non-nuclear blast in history up to that point — equivalent to 21,000 pounds of TNT.

It was the single biggest loss of Marines since the Battle of Iwo Jima.

The incident hastened the withdrawal of U.S. and international peacekeepers. A contingent of Marines continued to guard the embassy until 1986 and on a temporary basis through the early 1990s. Seeing the return of full-time MSGs marks a proud day for many who served there.

“It is just right to have our Marines there with our ambassador and our team,” said Maj. Gen. Mark Brilakis, the commanding general of Marine Corps Recruiting Command. He served in Beirut as a lieutenant at the time of the barracks bombing and lost six fellow Marines from his unit. “It is good for the State Department and good for the Marine Corps and good for the nation of Lebanon.”

The return to Beirut is a sign of U.S. commitment to diplomacy, said Fred Lash, a retired Marine public affairs officer who served in Beirut at the time of the first embassy bombing.

Lash, a charter member of the Beirut Veterans of America, who refers to that chapter of Marine history as “the first battle against terrorism,” added that the return is a proud moment not just for Marines, but for the country as a whole.

“I think it takes things full circle. They can knock you off the horse, and you can stay off the horse for a while, but you are going to get in the saddle again,” he said. “It shows willingness on the part of the American people and State Department to stick with this diplomacy thing.”

When Lash arrived in March 1983, he said things were peaceful. He would often drive up to Le Commodore Hotel, where much of the press corps he dealt with lived.

“It was a soft-cover kind of trip,” he said. “We might have had a helmet and flak thrown in the back, but we thought peace was just around the corner. Then the bombing started.”

The first major strike was against the embassy on April 18, 1983. Lash had been slated to hold a joint news briefing with the State Department there, but a last minute decision was made to hold it at the airport.

About five to 10 minutes after 1 p.m., a massive explosion erupted, killing 17 Americans including the Marine at Post One. In all, 63 people died in the embassy explosion. The recovery included accounting for the human toll, as well as digging out the Marine killed at Post One and the U.S. flag, which Lash was entrusted to deliver to leadership at the Pentagon.

'The continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence'

Brilakis, then a naval gunfire support team leader, said his Marines began taking fire not long after arriving with Bravo Battery, 1st Battlaion, 10th Marines, assigned to Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 8th Marines.

“Some of the fighting going on between the Lebanese army and various militias started to affect the airport,” he said. “Our days were filled with patrolling. When things got a little more fractious and a little more lethal, we spent more time providing security.”

From their position near the airport, the Marines were easy targets from surrounding mountains.

Burlakis said in a Sept. 19, 1983, story in the Los Angeles Times, “This position breaks all the rules,” as Marines worked each day to fortify their positions with sandbags as added protection against rocket and artillery fire.

“I think for those who have learned that Marines are back in Beirut representing the Marine Corps and defending sovereign U.S. soil in that embassy — it is a point of pride to have Marines back in that embassy,” he said.

Last October, he attended the 30th anniversary observance ceremony at the Beirut Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, for the barracks bombing.

“The overarching emotion from all those guys was one of pride, pride of being Marines, pride of having served in a location where their nation sent them. They were ordered to go do a job and they did it the best way they could,” he said. “What happened in Beirut, why we went and what we tried to do is another star in the constellation that is the U.S. Marine Corps.”

The re-establishment of an MSG presence in Beirut reflects current efforts to bolster security at embassies across the globe.

“This is another phase of the continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence in Beirut,” said Capt. Eric Flanagan, the Marine Corps Embassy Security Group spokesman at the Pentagon. “It is a re-energizing and reaffirmation of our commitment to our diplomatic security mission. Additionally, this is a sign of the steady growth of the Marine Security Guard program.”

Following the 2012 attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, Congress directed the Marine Corps to add 1,000 Marine security guards throughout the world.

Currently, the Marine Corps has about 1,500 security guards and it plans to add hundreds more next year so it can meet its target of 2,200 guards by 2016. The State Department has identified about 35 diplomatic posts that need Marine guards, of which the Corps has opened detachments at 17, including in South Africa, Gabon and the Republic of Congo.

The Marine Corps has also created a Security Augmentation Unit based at Marine Corps base Quantico, Virginia, that has about 130 Marines who can deploy immediately if needed to bolster diplomatic security. Those Marines are trained embassy guards.

“I’m really proud of what Marines doing with MSAU and the Special Purpose-MAGTF,“ Lash said. “They can do all the things in the world to make you pull out, but it is really a good feeling to go back in. I would say Tripoli at some point — when the situation is right — we’ll go back, set up the embassy and MSG will be there.”
 Choche Gonzalez , Angie Dolan-Thompson , Ashlee Dalton , Dawn Michelle Martin Loving , Jay Bennett , Mikaela Mason , Susan Kay Dejonge , Jim Herkenhoff likes this
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Hitham Benghazi Alsonosi shared ‎عاجل بنغازي‎'s video: ‎الجيش الليبي يؤمن سجن الكويفية‎.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:22:56 PM
الجيش الليبي يؤمن سجن الكويفية
أبطال معركة الكرامة من الجيش والشرطة تسيطر علي سجن الكويفية و محيطه وتأمين المنطقة بالكامل ولازالت القوات تتقدم .
كبرو كبرو مشاء الله ولا حول ولا قوة الا بالله .
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Star Benghazi shared Ahmad Alzway's video.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:21:40 PM

هلها خلاصين وحلها قهوين وحق بي ^^ .

من امام بيت بوكا .
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Greg Clever shared The Revolution's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:20:23 PM
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I will NOT vote for
Killary Benghazi Clinton
Like & Share~Ryan
Like this page

https://www.facebook.com/FreedomFromTyranny2013 — with Pam Horton and .
 Irene Zikoria likes this
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Gary Cook shared Together We Served's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:19:47 PM
God bless them all!
Timeline Photos
Beirut mission renewed: Marines take pride in returning to guard embassy

(View Together We Served's Memorial Roster http://marines.togetherweserved.com/publicassociationroster/332)

The return of Marines to Beirut as full-time embassy guards for the first time in more than 30 years is a notable milestone for those who fought to maintain stability in Lebanon, a country oft-wracked with religious and ethnic tensions.

As of early September, Marine security guards are again manning Post One in Beirut. From their perch in the lobby they screen building visitors and, most importantly, safeguard classified information for the first time since the 1980s.

The post holds profound significance for Marines young and old. The embassy there was bombed in 1983 and again in 1984. But the most vicious attack occurred in October 1983 when a suicide bomber in an explosive-laden truck destroyed the Marine Corps barracks at the Beirut airport killing 220 Marines, 18 sailors and three soldiers. Official investigations would later reveal that the explosion was the largest non-nuclear blast in history up to that point — equivalent to 21,000 pounds of TNT.

It was the single biggest loss of Marines since the Battle of Iwo Jima.

The incident hastened the withdrawal of U.S. and international peacekeepers. A contingent of Marines continued to guard the embassy until 1986 and on a temporary basis through the early 1990s. Seeing the return of full-time MSGs marks a proud day for many who served there.

“It is just right to have our Marines there with our ambassador and our team,” said Maj. Gen. Mark Brilakis, the commanding general of Marine Corps Recruiting Command. He served in Beirut as a lieutenant at the time of the barracks bombing and lost six fellow Marines from his unit. “It is good for the State Department and good for the Marine Corps and good for the nation of Lebanon.”

The return to Beirut is a sign of U.S. commitment to diplomacy, said Fred Lash, a retired Marine public affairs officer who served in Beirut at the time of the first embassy bombing.

Lash, a charter member of the Beirut Veterans of America, who refers to that chapter of Marine history as “the first battle against terrorism,” added that the return is a proud moment not just for Marines, but for the country as a whole.

“I think it takes things full circle. They can knock you off the horse, and you can stay off the horse for a while, but you are going to get in the saddle again,” he said. “It shows willingness on the part of the American people and State Department to stick with this diplomacy thing.”

When Lash arrived in March 1983, he said things were peaceful. He would often drive up to Le Commodore Hotel, where much of the press corps he dealt with lived.

“It was a soft-cover kind of trip,” he said. “We might have had a helmet and flak thrown in the back, but we thought peace was just around the corner. Then the bombing started.”

The first major strike was against the embassy on April 18, 1983. Lash had been slated to hold a joint news briefing with the State Department there, but a last minute decision was made to hold it at the airport.

About five to 10 minutes after 1 p.m., a massive explosion erupted, killing 17 Americans including the Marine at Post One. In all, 63 people died in the embassy explosion. The recovery included accounting for the human toll, as well as digging out the Marine killed at Post One and the U.S. flag, which Lash was entrusted to deliver to leadership at the Pentagon.

'The continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence'

Brilakis, then a naval gunfire support team leader, said his Marines began taking fire not long after arriving with Bravo Battery, 1st Battlaion, 10th Marines, assigned to Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 8th Marines.

“Some of the fighting going on between the Lebanese army and various militias started to affect the airport,” he said. “Our days were filled with patrolling. When things got a little more fractious and a little more lethal, we spent more time providing security.”

From their position near the airport, the Marines were easy targets from surrounding mountains.

Burlakis said in a Sept. 19, 1983, story in the Los Angeles Times, “This position breaks all the rules,” as Marines worked each day to fortify their positions with sandbags as added protection against rocket and artillery fire.

“I think for those who have learned that Marines are back in Beirut representing the Marine Corps and defending sovereign U.S. soil in that embassy — it is a point of pride to have Marines back in that embassy,” he said.

Last October, he attended the 30th anniversary observance ceremony at the Beirut Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, for the barracks bombing.

“The overarching emotion from all those guys was one of pride, pride of being Marines, pride of having served in a location where their nation sent them. They were ordered to go do a job and they did it the best way they could,” he said. “What happened in Beirut, why we went and what we tried to do is another star in the constellation that is the U.S. Marine Corps.”

The re-establishment of an MSG presence in Beirut reflects current efforts to bolster security at embassies across the globe.

“This is another phase of the continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence in Beirut,” said Capt. Eric Flanagan, the Marine Corps Embassy Security Group spokesman at the Pentagon. “It is a re-energizing and reaffirmation of our commitment to our diplomatic security mission. Additionally, this is a sign of the steady growth of the Marine Security Guard program.”

Following the 2012 attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, Congress directed the Marine Corps to add 1,000 Marine security guards throughout the world.

Currently, the Marine Corps has about 1,500 security guards and it plans to add hundreds more next year so it can meet its target of 2,200 guards by 2016. The State Department has identified about 35 diplomatic posts that need Marine guards, of which the Corps has opened detachments at 17, including in South Africa, Gabon and the Republic of Congo.

The Marine Corps has also created a Security Augmentation Unit based at Marine Corps base Quantico, Virginia, that has about 130 Marines who can deploy immediately if needed to bolster diplomatic security. Those Marines are trained embassy guards.

“I’m really proud of what Marines doing with MSAU and the Special Purpose-MAGTF,“ Lash said. “They can do all the things in the world to make you pull out, but it is really a good feeling to go back in. I would say Tripoli at some point — when the situation is right — we’ll go back, set up the embassy and MSG will be there.”
 Norman Crowe likes this
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Jeff Benghazi Gresio shared Dan Sullivan's video.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:18:51 PM

During this campaign, Mark Begich has attacked me for my work to protect women from domestic abuse, for forcing Wall Street to return hundreds of millions to Alaska’s teachers, and even for leaving my home in Alaska to fight terrorism after 9/11. Why is Mark so desperate? Because on EPA overreach, ObamaCare, gun rights, amnesty, and spending, Mark Begich is on Obama's side, and I’m on Alaska’s side.
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بنغازى تنتصر Benghazi Win
at Oct 23, 2014 8:12:15 PM
عااجل. الخارجية الليبية تقيل السفير الليبي في تركيا ??? لا ذيول بعد اليوم
 فرج المغربي , شموخ الجبل شموخ الجبل , محمد العبيدي , العنود الحاءر , محمد الزيانى , Om Saad , Hammadi Netfa likes this
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اللي مع الكرامه والجيش والشرطه والدستور لايك .....نورونا حضورك مرعب للخوارج
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Jim Benghazi Bennett shared U.S. 93.3's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:06:42 PM
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'Bout died laughing when i read this... LIKE if you think its hilarious, too!
 April Benghazi Swintosky , Larry Spence , Angela Way likes this
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August Benghazi Nacho
at Oct 23, 2014 8:05:24 PM
http://youtu.be/EOcs0D5bZio
The Beatles-A Day In The Life (2009 Remaster) With Lyrics
Lyrics-I read the news today oh, boy About a lucky man who made the grade And though the news was rather sad Well, i just had to laugh I saw the photograph H...
 Jeri Lee Smith-Noce likes this
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Benghazi-old Old shared Wesam ELaghib's video: ‎قصيدة حسن السوسي . يا اهل بنغازي‎.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:01:46 PM
قصيدة حسن السوسي . يا اهل بنغازي
قصيدة حسن السوسي . يا اهل بنغازي
DP
Lynn Benghazi Kelso shared boom 97.3's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:01:32 PM
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Oh my Oh my...i'm gonna bet this was made in 'murica. #LOL ~ Meredith Shaw

get the boom app : http://bit.ly/theboomapp
 Russell Hathaway , Ralyn Sue Speerly Schraceo , Brandie Smith , Gary L. Maslonka likes this
Ralyn Sue Speerly Schraceo commented at Oct 23, 2014 8:11:11 PM
        rofl
DP
Wayne Bell
at Oct 23, 2014 8:00:51 PM
And we're furious no one has been held accountable or gone to jail for Benghazi, Fast and Furious, and the IRS scandal.

Eric Holder is 'frustrated' that no one went to jail for the financial crisis. Do you agree with him? Here's are 6 things we learned from his candid interview with CNN's Evan Perez: http://cnn.it/1rrxaD1
DP
Michael Hannon shared Together We Served's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 8:00:14 PM
God Bless Each and Everyone of those Marines Lost, Along With All the Other Servicemen and Women Who Selflessly Made the Ultimate Sacrifice During That Period!!! Semper FI Marines!!!
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Beirut mission renewed: Marines take pride in returning to guard embassy

(View Together We Served's Memorial Roster http://marines.togetherweserved.com/publicassociationroster/332)

The return of Marines to Beirut as full-time embassy guards for the first time in more than 30 years is a notable milestone for those who fought to maintain stability in Lebanon, a country oft-wracked with religious and ethnic tensions.

As of early September, Marine security guards are again manning Post One in Beirut. From their perch in the lobby they screen building visitors and, most importantly, safeguard classified information for the first time since the 1980s.

The post holds profound significance for Marines young and old. The embassy there was bombed in 1983 and again in 1984. But the most vicious attack occurred in October 1983 when a suicide bomber in an explosive-laden truck destroyed the Marine Corps barracks at the Beirut airport killing 220 Marines, 18 sailors and three soldiers. Official investigations would later reveal that the explosion was the largest non-nuclear blast in history up to that point — equivalent to 21,000 pounds of TNT.

It was the single biggest loss of Marines since the Battle of Iwo Jima.

The incident hastened the withdrawal of U.S. and international peacekeepers. A contingent of Marines continued to guard the embassy until 1986 and on a temporary basis through the early 1990s. Seeing the return of full-time MSGs marks a proud day for many who served there.

“It is just right to have our Marines there with our ambassador and our team,” said Maj. Gen. Mark Brilakis, the commanding general of Marine Corps Recruiting Command. He served in Beirut as a lieutenant at the time of the barracks bombing and lost six fellow Marines from his unit. “It is good for the State Department and good for the Marine Corps and good for the nation of Lebanon.”

The return to Beirut is a sign of U.S. commitment to diplomacy, said Fred Lash, a retired Marine public affairs officer who served in Beirut at the time of the first embassy bombing.

Lash, a charter member of the Beirut Veterans of America, who refers to that chapter of Marine history as “the first battle against terrorism,” added that the return is a proud moment not just for Marines, but for the country as a whole.

“I think it takes things full circle. They can knock you off the horse, and you can stay off the horse for a while, but you are going to get in the saddle again,” he said. “It shows willingness on the part of the American people and State Department to stick with this diplomacy thing.”

When Lash arrived in March 1983, he said things were peaceful. He would often drive up to Le Commodore Hotel, where much of the press corps he dealt with lived.

“It was a soft-cover kind of trip,” he said. “We might have had a helmet and flak thrown in the back, but we thought peace was just around the corner. Then the bombing started.”

The first major strike was against the embassy on April 18, 1983. Lash had been slated to hold a joint news briefing with the State Department there, but a last minute decision was made to hold it at the airport.

About five to 10 minutes after 1 p.m., a massive explosion erupted, killing 17 Americans including the Marine at Post One. In all, 63 people died in the embassy explosion. The recovery included accounting for the human toll, as well as digging out the Marine killed at Post One and the U.S. flag, which Lash was entrusted to deliver to leadership at the Pentagon.

'The continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence'

Brilakis, then a naval gunfire support team leader, said his Marines began taking fire not long after arriving with Bravo Battery, 1st Battlaion, 10th Marines, assigned to Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 8th Marines.

“Some of the fighting going on between the Lebanese army and various militias started to affect the airport,” he said. “Our days were filled with patrolling. When things got a little more fractious and a little more lethal, we spent more time providing security.”

From their position near the airport, the Marines were easy targets from surrounding mountains.

Burlakis said in a Sept. 19, 1983, story in the Los Angeles Times, “This position breaks all the rules,” as Marines worked each day to fortify their positions with sandbags as added protection against rocket and artillery fire.

“I think for those who have learned that Marines are back in Beirut representing the Marine Corps and defending sovereign U.S. soil in that embassy — it is a point of pride to have Marines back in that embassy,” he said.

Last October, he attended the 30th anniversary observance ceremony at the Beirut Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, for the barracks bombing.

“The overarching emotion from all those guys was one of pride, pride of being Marines, pride of having served in a location where their nation sent them. They were ordered to go do a job and they did it the best way they could,” he said. “What happened in Beirut, why we went and what we tried to do is another star in the constellation that is the U.S. Marine Corps.”

The re-establishment of an MSG presence in Beirut reflects current efforts to bolster security at embassies across the globe.

“This is another phase of the continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence in Beirut,” said Capt. Eric Flanagan, the Marine Corps Embassy Security Group spokesman at the Pentagon. “It is a re-energizing and reaffirmation of our commitment to our diplomatic security mission. Additionally, this is a sign of the steady growth of the Marine Security Guard program.”

Following the 2012 attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, Congress directed the Marine Corps to add 1,000 Marine security guards throughout the world.

Currently, the Marine Corps has about 1,500 security guards and it plans to add hundreds more next year so it can meet its target of 2,200 guards by 2016. The State Department has identified about 35 diplomatic posts that need Marine guards, of which the Corps has opened detachments at 17, including in South Africa, Gabon and the Republic of Congo.

The Marine Corps has also created a Security Augmentation Unit based at Marine Corps base Quantico, Virginia, that has about 130 Marines who can deploy immediately if needed to bolster diplomatic security. Those Marines are trained embassy guards.

“I’m really proud of what Marines doing with MSAU and the Special Purpose-MAGTF,“ Lash said. “They can do all the things in the world to make you pull out, but it is really a good feeling to go back in. I would say Tripoli at some point — when the situation is right — we’ll go back, set up the embassy and MSG will be there.”
Charles Turner commented at Oct 23, 2014 8:20:43 PM
        RIP Shipmates...
DP
Arjwan Benghazi shared ‎شتاوي ليبيه مصوره‎'s photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 7:55:16 PM
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الادمن
#fazz
 حكاية امل , Haderr Tarek , Beeba Bosedra , جيجي طارق likes this
جيجي طارق commented at Oct 23, 2014 8:05:06 PM
        الله اكبر الله اكبر الله اكبر الله اكبر
Haderr Tarek commented at Oct 23, 2014 8:15:01 PM
        الله اكبر
DP
Arizona Veterans Connection shared Together We Served's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 7:54:39 PM
Timeline Photos
Beirut mission renewed: Marines take pride in returning to guard embassy

(View Together We Served's Memorial Roster http://marines.togetherweserved.com/publicassociationroster/332)

The return of Marines to Beirut as full-time embassy guards for the first time in more than 30 years is a notable milestone for those who fought to maintain stability in Lebanon, a country oft-wracked with religious and ethnic tensions.

As of early September, Marine security guards are again manning Post One in Beirut. From their perch in the lobby they screen building visitors and, most importantly, safeguard classified information for the first time since the 1980s.

The post holds profound significance for Marines young and old. The embassy there was bombed in 1983 and again in 1984. But the most vicious attack occurred in October 1983 when a suicide bomber in an explosive-laden truck destroyed the Marine Corps barracks at the Beirut airport killing 220 Marines, 18 sailors and three soldiers. Official investigations would later reveal that the explosion was the largest non-nuclear blast in history up to that point — equivalent to 21,000 pounds of TNT.

It was the single biggest loss of Marines since the Battle of Iwo Jima.

The incident hastened the withdrawal of U.S. and international peacekeepers. A contingent of Marines continued to guard the embassy until 1986 and on a temporary basis through the early 1990s. Seeing the return of full-time MSGs marks a proud day for many who served there.

“It is just right to have our Marines there with our ambassador and our team,” said Maj. Gen. Mark Brilakis, the commanding general of Marine Corps Recruiting Command. He served in Beirut as a lieutenant at the time of the barracks bombing and lost six fellow Marines from his unit. “It is good for the State Department and good for the Marine Corps and good for the nation of Lebanon.”

The return to Beirut is a sign of U.S. commitment to diplomacy, said Fred Lash, a retired Marine public affairs officer who served in Beirut at the time of the first embassy bombing.

Lash, a charter member of the Beirut Veterans of America, who refers to that chapter of Marine history as “the first battle against terrorism,” added that the return is a proud moment not just for Marines, but for the country as a whole.

“I think it takes things full circle. They can knock you off the horse, and you can stay off the horse for a while, but you are going to get in the saddle again,” he said. “It shows willingness on the part of the American people and State Department to stick with this diplomacy thing.”

When Lash arrived in March 1983, he said things were peaceful. He would often drive up to Le Commodore Hotel, where much of the press corps he dealt with lived.

“It was a soft-cover kind of trip,” he said. “We might have had a helmet and flak thrown in the back, but we thought peace was just around the corner. Then the bombing started.”

The first major strike was against the embassy on April 18, 1983. Lash had been slated to hold a joint news briefing with the State Department there, but a last minute decision was made to hold it at the airport.

About five to 10 minutes after 1 p.m., a massive explosion erupted, killing 17 Americans including the Marine at Post One. In all, 63 people died in the embassy explosion. The recovery included accounting for the human toll, as well as digging out the Marine killed at Post One and the U.S. flag, which Lash was entrusted to deliver to leadership at the Pentagon.

'The continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence'

Brilakis, then a naval gunfire support team leader, said his Marines began taking fire not long after arriving with Bravo Battery, 1st Battlaion, 10th Marines, assigned to Battalion Landing Team 1st Battalion, 8th Marines.

“Some of the fighting going on between the Lebanese army and various militias started to affect the airport,” he said. “Our days were filled with patrolling. When things got a little more fractious and a little more lethal, we spent more time providing security.”

From their position near the airport, the Marines were easy targets from surrounding mountains.

Burlakis said in a Sept. 19, 1983, story in the Los Angeles Times, “This position breaks all the rules,” as Marines worked each day to fortify their positions with sandbags as added protection against rocket and artillery fire.

“I think for those who have learned that Marines are back in Beirut representing the Marine Corps and defending sovereign U.S. soil in that embassy — it is a point of pride to have Marines back in that embassy,” he said.

Last October, he attended the 30th anniversary observance ceremony at the Beirut Memorial in Jacksonville, North Carolina, for the barracks bombing.

“The overarching emotion from all those guys was one of pride, pride of being Marines, pride of having served in a location where their nation sent them. They were ordered to go do a job and they did it the best way they could,” he said. “What happened in Beirut, why we went and what we tried to do is another star in the constellation that is the U.S. Marine Corps.”

The re-establishment of an MSG presence in Beirut reflects current efforts to bolster security at embassies across the globe.

“This is another phase of the continuing legacy of Marine Corps presence in Beirut,” said Capt. Eric Flanagan, the Marine Corps Embassy Security Group spokesman at the Pentagon. “It is a re-energizing and reaffirmation of our commitment to our diplomatic security mission. Additionally, this is a sign of the steady growth of the Marine Security Guard program.”

Following the 2012 attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, Congress directed the Marine Corps to add 1,000 Marine security guards throughout the world.

Currently, the Marine Corps has about 1,500 security guards and it plans to add hundreds more next year so it can meet its target of 2,200 guards by 2016. The State Department has identified about 35 diplomatic posts that need Marine guards, of which the Corps has opened detachments at 17, including in South Africa, Gabon and the Republic of Congo.

The Marine Corps has also created a Security Augmentation Unit based at Marine Corps base Quantico, Virginia, that has about 130 Marines who can deploy immediately if needed to bolster diplomatic security. Those Marines are trained embassy guards.

“I’m really proud of what Marines doing with MSAU and the Special Purpose-MAGTF,“ Lash said. “They can do all the things in the world to make you pull out, but it is really a good feeling to go back in. I would say Tripoli at some point — when the situation is right — we’ll go back, set up the embassy and MSG will be there.”
 Jimmy Carlisle , Dave Kimmel , William de Larm likes this
DP
Rosa Sepulveda shared AMERICAN - STRONG!'s photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 7:52:11 PM
Benghazi all over again !! God have mercy
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We as Americans are pleading... do not let this crap happen again!!

www.AmericanStrong.com
 Craig Ruby , Jackeline Crespo likes this
Craig Ruby commented at Oct 23, 2014 8:29:37 PM
        I guess email I received was right about something going on in Baghdad yesterday.
DP
Ed Benghazi Peters shared Uncle Sam's Misguided Children's photo.
at Oct 23, 2014 7:48:01 PM
TRUE!!!!!!
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Only one group of individuals we should give thanks for this and they are all in DC.

#NoObama #UncleSamsMisguidedChildren — with Eric Mcbride.
 Allkinds OfTrouble , Deer Magnet , Mike Maddog Madigan likes this
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