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Michael John
at Nov 19, 2014 7:47:56 AM
Be interesting to hear people's comments to Tomnods answers to some basic questions on twitter last night. I find the middle answer the most heartless. Nice to know someone has moved on from #mh370. So it appears that the whole tomnod campaign was for commercial gain rather than any compassion for the families of those on board the missing plane....
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Denise Wong
at Nov 15, 2014 5:36:32 AM
Now I am calling on all the experts to look at this image, it is raw, unaltered, look at the shapes, look at the sizes, find me another satellite image that is this clear. Forget what's logical for a moment. Science is ever evolving. This was taken after #mh370 disappeared, fact. Tomnod has already admitted that the image is genuine however the problem is they can't positively say that it is the missing plane. They know it's a plane but without positive Identification & the current interpretation of the Inmarsat data leading to the waters off Australia nobody will search the area in which this image was taken. I have spoken to a guy who is a big name in #Malaysia & a lawyer at that who confirms that no other plane has crashed in this area & that the location fits the plane & boat woman's reports irregardless of whether you believe them, he also let slip there was multiple police reports in this area too but when pushed on this comment he refused to elaborate further. No smoke without fire. I know that the oceans are massive places however a #777 does not just disappear without trace. Never mind scanning the ocean bed, dragging that towfish through the water will be enough to dislodge any debris. I have tried & failed to explain how the plane crashed in this location or how it only broke into 3 main pieces. However I do know examining plane crash photos that the plane would break apart in the way the image shows. I have spent many months in contact with the AAIB who have done nothing to allay my fears this could be the missing plane & even AMSA admitted in the early days that the image was a positive identification. So why was the area never searched? Well only Malaysia who did the interpretation of the Inmarsat data can answer that 1!!!!!
Now I am calling on all the experts to look at this image, it is raw, unaltered, look at the shapes, look at the sizes, find me another satellite image that is this clear. Forget what's logical for a moment. Science is ever evolving. This was taken after #mh370 disappeared, fact. Tomnod has already admitted that the image is genuine however the problem is they can't positively say that it is the missing plane. They know it's a plane but without positive Identification & the current interpretation of the Inmarsat data leading to the waters off Australia nobody will search the area in which this image was taken. I have spoken to a guy who is a big name in #Malaysia & a lawyer at that who confirms that no other plane has crashed in this area & that the location fits the plane & boat woman's reports irregardless of whether you believe them, he also let slip there was multiple police reports in this area too but when pushed on this comment he refused to elaborate further. No smoke without fire. I know that the oceans are massive places however a #777 does not just disappear without trace. Never mind scanning the ocean bed, dragging that towfish through the water will be enough to dislodge any debris. I have tried & failed to explain how the plane crashed in this location or how it only broke into 3 main pieces. However I do know examining plane crash photos that the plane would break apart in the way the image shows. I have spent many months in contact with the AAIB who have done nothing to allay my fears this could be the missing plane & even AMSA admitted in the early days that the image was a positive identification. So why was the area never searched? Well only Malaysia who did the interpretation of the Inmarsat data can answer that 1!!!!!
13/11/2014 - 1
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Michael John
at Nov 9, 2014 9:15:51 AM
I still believe that the plane crashed in the area North west of Sumatra before the wreckage drifted to the location I have those images for. Interestingly enough, privately not publicly it appears to have caused controversy & to date despite many conversations with the likes of AAIB & tomnod, those images have not been rejected. In fact I received a rather seemingly frustrated email from a top level employee of the AAIB who requested me to send my correspondence directly to the Malaysian authorities. Seems like the Malaysians publicly announce that they are taking advice from experts like the AAIB & yet the AAIB has not confirmed this to be the case. & no I have never received a reply back from the Malaysian authorities. I find it of great concern that the images that have been verified by the provider (tomnod) as genuine & potentially could indeed be the missing plane could be so openly dismissed out of hand solely on the basis that the interpretation of the Inmarsat data could never be wrong!!!! I have done plenty of research & can find no evidence that the said area was ever included in any official search. For me the mystery of #MH370 does not just lie with the planes whereabouts but also with the strange way it's disappearance has to date been investigated by the #Malaysian authorities.
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MrMacMartini
at Oct 26, 2014 10:58:02 AM
#crowdsourcing for Emergency Management: Online Search for Tunante II Concludes · Tomnod http://buff.ly/1zsOXna
Online Search for Tunante II Concludes
*Treacherous waters* On August 26th 2014, the *Tunante II*, a 12.5 meter-long yacht with four crew on board, declared emergency...
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Morri Young
at Oct 25, 2014 2:09:32 AM
Amazing use of crowds and of satellites. http://www.tomnod.com/ uses satellite images and invites the crowd to search a small part of the world to identify important finds. For example, 12m tags across the ocean looking for the MH370, or border crossings in north Africa. Have a spare 20 minutes? Search an area. It can be addictive though! 
Tomnod - Crowdsource the World
Tomnod uses the power of crowdsourcing to identify objects and places in satellite images. Use our satellite images to explore the Earth, solve real-world problems, and view amazing images of our changing planet.
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Roberto BIANCA
at Oct 18, 2014 4:34:47 AM
indianoceansearch
Report on a search of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 The following images are a compilation of the objects found in a manual scanning of satellite pictures made available by Tomnod. After visual scanning of thousands of pictures we report the Indian Ocean a...
indianoceansearch
Report on a search of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 The following images are a compilation of the objects found in a manual scanning of satellite pictures made available by Tomnod. After visual scanning of thousands of pictu...
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Jose Antonio Jerez
at Sep 18, 2014 6:31:35 PM
Còmo buscar al Tunante II en Tomnod.com: http://youtu.be/Ppj42570uTw

Todos a buscarlo!!!
Tomnod - Crowdsource the World
Tomnod uses the power of crowdsourcing to identify objects and places in satellite images. Use our satellite images to explore the Earth, solve real-world problems, and view amazing images of our changing planet.
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Save the Tunante II - Rescue the Tunante II
Rescue attempts for 4 missing Argentinians shipwrecked off the coast of Brazil have been suspended due to bad weather. Help continue the search for their sailboat, Tunante II by searching satellite imagery of their approximate location.
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Crowdsourcing Week
at Aug 30, 2014 11:45:14 PM
#Crowdsourcing The Search For #Malaysia Flight #MH370 by @lukeinusa of @tomnod #video http://ow.ly/A9FjP
Crowdsourcing The Search For Malaysia Flight MH370 - CSW Global 2014
Presented at Crowdsourcing Week Global 2014 by Luke Barrington, Tomnod. Join us for CSW Global 2015! More Information: http://crowdsourcingweek.com/ and http...
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Tomnod
at Aug 25, 2014 4:59:27 PM

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Tomnod
at Aug 25, 2014 4:36:20 PM

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Julius Edradan
at Aug 22, 2014 11:32:10 AM
TOMNOD
TOMNOD’S SATELLITE IMAGE, IS IT GENUINE OR HOAX? - Bubblews
This is the photo caption as published: “A satellite image provided by Tomnod, the online map site used by millions of netizens in the search for th...
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DigitalGlobe
at Aug 20, 2014 9:46:05 PM
Join a new Tomnod campaign with Global Forest Watch to review fire-prone areas in Indonesia, mark areas where they spot active fires, and indicate areas that show signs of recent burning. 
Global Forest Watch
Global Forest Watch (GFW) is a partnership that provides the most current, reliable, and actionable information about what is happening in forests worldwide.
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tim paynter
at Jun 24, 2014 5:19:42 AM
Big Mistakes Cost Bigly
Digital Globe Image Found On Tomnod In a perfect world everything goes perfectly.  In the ocean, when one thing does not go well, everything goes wrongly, fast.  There are a lot of things that went wrong for the crew of the Nina.  When the crew comes back, ...
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Michael Thompson
at Jun 20, 2014 3:51:27 PM
Five innovative examples of crowdsourcing

Every week we bring you the FreshMinds Friday picks – ideas to help you make the most of digital technologies and understand how they are helping brands to grow and innovate. This week we’re looking at five great examples of crowdsourcing from using it to aid the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane to helping redesign London’s parks.

The search for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane

On 11th March, DigitalGlobe launched its crowdsourcing platform Tomnod and invited the public to look at images from its high-definition satellites to help find the missing aircraft. On Tomnod users are asked to tag areas of the map that may show wreckage, rafts, oil slicks or anything else that may be interesting or suspicious. An algorithm called CrowdRank is then used to determine the most promising leads in the search for the plane, paying close attention to where people multiple people have tagged the same location. So far there have been 257 million “map views” and 2.9 million areas “tagged” by participants, with DigitalGlobe reporting that 3 million people have participated so far.

Cancer Research’s app fuelled data crunching

Cancer Research’s game Play to Cure: Genes in Space is an innovative new way to use the crowd to crunch vital scientific data. In the game users work for a company called Bifrost Industries and are tasked with the mission to collect a “valuable and tradable substance Element Alpha”. Element Alpha represents genetic cancer data.

During the game players rise through the ranks at work by:
Mapping a route through the densest areas of Element Alpha
Following the route as they collect Element Alpha and destroy asteroids
Avoiding and shooting asteroids to get to the next level of Element Alpha collection
Upgrading their ship to become more powerful and trading Element Alpha for points
Data analysis goes back to Cancer Research’s scientists at two main points: the first is when users are mapping a route through the Element Alpha; the second is when users are flying their spaceship through the intergalactic space course to collect Element Alpha. By finding a route through Element Alpha users are “actually plotting a course through genuine ‘DNA microarray’ data” which is then analysed by scientists. This has enabled scientists to cut the time it takes them to analyse data significantly.

Coach’s crowdsourcing of product shoots

Kyle Stock at Mashable commented on the trend for fashion and make-up brands to leverage social media and effectively crowdsource their product shoots. One such example of this is Coach’s integration of photos posted on Instagram, Twitter and Pose into an interactive microsite. Images tagged on those social media platforms with #coachfromabove are curated by the site to promote their product in a more naturalistic way.

Lambeth Council’s redesign of parks

Off the back of their successful Lambeth Library Challenge (delivered in partnership with White October) Lambeth Council is currently giving people the opportunity to help redesign some of its parks using “real” budgets. Part of the ethos behind the game is the council’s desire to work in closer collaboration with local communities to identify what services they want in their outdoor spaces. The Lambeth Parks Challenge gives players the opportunity to “set up a virtual park and try [their] hand as park designer, manager and gardener, all within budget”. By looking at what game users choose the council is hoping to gain a better insight into what local people’s priorities are.

The GoldCorp Challenge

Rob McEwen harnessed the crowd through his Goldcorp Challenge and in the process helped turn people all over the world into gold prospectors. McEwen triggered a gold rush by releasing his company’s geological data, which ran back to 1948, into the public space. He offered a prize of $575,000 in prizes to the participants who could came up with the best methods of identifying where they would be able to find gold. As a result of the challenge more than 110 sites were identified, of which 50% were unknown to the company before the challenge was launched. Of these more than 80% yielded significant gold reserves. In total, more than $6 billion of gold was found.

http://www.freshminds.net/2014/03/five-top-examples-crowdsourcing/
FreshMinds - Five innovative examples of crowdsourcing
Five innovative ways that crowdsourcing is being used by brands and organisations - from a modern day gold rush to redesigning London's parks in Lambeth.
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Michael Thompson
at Jun 20, 2014 3:39:29 PM
Site lets people search satellite images for lost Malaysian plane

A crowdsourcing platform called Tomnod is letting volunteers comb through satellite images and tag objects of interest.

Netizens are turning to a satellite imagery crowdsourcing platform called Tomnod to help find Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, the jetliner that mysteriously disappeared Saturday while in flight from Malaysia to Beijing with 239 people on board.

Tomnod, which relies on satellite imagery from parent company DigitalGlobe, allows people to volunteer their time to comb through images, tag objects of interest, and solve real-world problems.

Monday, Tomnod and DigitalGlobe formally kicked off a crowdsourcing campaign to help find the Boeing 777 aircraft, which disappeared from radar screens after entering the Gulf of Thailand. Authorities are still searching for the jetliner and trying to determine what went wrong.

People can assist in the search by joining the Tomnod volunteer team and tagging important locations and objects, such as potential airplane wreckage, in available satellite images, which are being updated regularly. Sunday, DigitalGlobe's satellites collected around 3,200 square kilometers of imagery from the Gulf of Thailand that can be analyzed by the Tomnod community.

DigitalGlobe purports to operate the world's most advanced constellation of commercial imaging satellites, and the company provides its imagery to Google. DigitalGlobe also maintains a subscription service called FirstLook that provides emergency professionals with Web-based access to timely imagery.

DigitalGlobe said Tuesday that Tomnod is fielding an "unprecedented level" of Web traffic after kicking off the campaign. The company also said that it has new image collections that it plans to make available as soon as possible.

DigitalGlobe acquired Tomnod in 2013. The site was used by thousands of volunteers to tag 60,000 objects in the first 24 hours after a typhoon hit the Philippines in November 2013.

http://www.cnet.com/news/site-lets-people-search-satellite-images-for-missing-malaysian-jetliner/
Site lets people search satellite images for lost Malaysian plane - CNET
A crowdsourcing platform called Tomnod is letting volunteers comb through satellite images and tag objects of interest.
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Didrik Strand
at May 24, 2014 4:18:07 PM
Tomnod Satellite tiles are tools to search for missing assets or help searching during disasters. Her is a link to Tomnod: http://www.tomnod.com/nod/challenge/ 
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Nicolas Slusarenko
at May 18, 2014 12:39:33 AM
The Tomnod mission is to utilize the power of crowdsourcing to identify objects and places in satellite images.
Tomnod - Crowdsource the World
Tomnod uses the power of crowdsourcing to identify objects and places in satellite images. Use our satellite images to explore the Earth, solve real-world problems, and view amazing images of our changing planet.
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Rubicon Social
at May 12, 2014 3:01:03 PM
MH370: Crisis Management Tips From Tomnod Image Crowdsourcing Company | Inc.com http://ow.ly/wEZtx
Inside the Crisis: How One Small Team Managed the Frantic Search for Flight 370
See what you can learn about responding rapidly and staying calm during a sudden, unprecedented spike in demand.
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DigitalGlobe
at May 5, 2014 9:23:46 PM
As the Tomnod crowd campaign for MH370 comes to a close, we wanted to share our thanks to those who tagged the millions of potential clues. We mourn with the families and friends of everyone on board MH370.
Crowdsourcing Malaysia Flight #MH370 – Campaign Comes To a Close | Seeing a Better World™
The Faces of DigitalGlobe: Lawrence Hollister. Crowdsourcing Malaysia Flight #MH370 – Campaign Comes To a Close. By DigitalGlobe | Published: May 5, 2014. We wanted to take a moment and thank you. Your response to our search for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 was incredible.
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